Rewilding my art


#1

Anyone ever made wild paint?


#2

Milk paint is a good start. My friend Leslie uses that a lot. She has multiple chemical sensitivity and can’t use industrial paint. I’ve used my own hair to create brushes:

Milk Paint:

Hair Brush:

Those are some ideas to start…


#3

Clay+water (i.e. mud) makes amazing paint if you’re okay with it washing away pretty much immediately. (I know that’s not what the original poster had in mind, but still.)


#4

It’s funny, (hmmmm, is funny the right word?), but there are a lot of companies now who sell “wild paint” or “earth paint” pigment kits, many of them processed though heat and other methods to obtain a wider color range. It is at least a step in the right direction compared to paint made from plastic or toxic chemicals. People are accustomed to having a full paint color range available, but the majority of wild harvested pigments tend to be in the red-white-brown-yellow-black range. There is a reason why the Pacific NW tribes were so eager to trade furs for boat paint with the first Europeans to come to Turtle Island! It is hard to resist easy acquisition of rich, concentrated and hard-to-find-in-nature colors like blue and green. But they are out there–they’re just not common. But one thing I NEVER want to see, is people trying to mine the Painted Hills for a wide natural color selection!!! Sensitivity to potential sources of natural color is crucial.