A Day in the Life


#1

Hey everyone!

So I am completely new to rewilding, and have some questions about it. There isn’t really a ton online of exactly what it looks like, so I’m hoping you guys can help.

  • Can you describe what a normal day in your life looks like?
  • How do you spend your time, what is your job, what are your hobbies, and just how do you live on a day-to-day basis?
  • Also, how do your daily activities help with rewilding?

I am very curious!

Thanks!

P.S. I’ll post my day in the comments. I haven’t done much with rewilding yet, but I’m hoping to continue learning about it.


#2

Hi! Let me just say that even just waiting five minutes at the bus stop can provide an opportunity to practice bird language while trying to keep your balance on one forefoot. Track the whereabouts of the geese from the bus while enjoying the sunrise colors as the bus emerges from under the cumulus downpour. At work, look outside when a bird alarm sounds, share gardening knowledge during your lunch walk, and learn from a colleague about her mother’s livestock. Another yet very different bus ride home, where you eat home grown corn on a cob and write your emails in E-prime. Dream about a half-buried badger, and wake up for another round with just a tiny bit more daylight, where the geese seem to have moved only a foot since yesterday. I try to share rather than spend time, and give rather than pay attention. Enjoy your journey!


#3

At this time, I consider myself to be 15-20% involved with living a ‘rewinding’ lifestyle. Most time spent alone, not looking to pick up any followers. I homestead with the seasons, so gardening, landscaping, DIY projects, and do arts and crafts. What makes it Rewilding is making my own clothes / resoling my mock’s, eating food I find in the woods (wildcrafting). I am hoping to scavenge a decent road kill for meat this season to butcher and go in the freezer. I scout the surrounding area to learn the lay of the land, learning to identify fora and fauna, and want to establish a base camp for practicing bush crafting which I consider related. Anyway, there is still much room for development but I am not trying to win any awards either.


#4

I could add being always barefoot, what could be said as having primal feet, is a further part of rewilding. There is expanding alertness that is part of that.


#5

Okay, so here’s my day.

I wake up at 6:30 every morning. I eat a decently good breakfast, like eggs or oatmeal, and take care of my four dogs. I am still a student, but I take classes from home, so I am at my computer or doing homework from about 8:00-2:00 each day. Once I am done with my schoolwork, I try to go outside some. My work is about 1/2 mile from home, so I walk there, no matter what the weather is. It helps minimize my footprint by not driving too.

In my day-to-day life, I don’t do a lot of rewilding, however, I am researching making natural soaps and minimizing waste. I’m enjoying learning from this forum!


#6

My day:
Workday -

  • Get up
  • Dress in all natural clothing
  • Drink some coffee and some jerky or hot cereal
  • Drive to work (I live about 10 miles from work).
  • Walk by the one lone tree between worker parking and the door, put out some bird seed if I can.
  • Go in work 8 hours (9 hours there if you count my lunch).
  • Walk back by the lone tree, checking on the buds/leaves depending on the season.
  • Take note of the patches of wildlands along the drive home, and the different types of weather.
  • If not dark yet, drink a cup of tea outside or walk in the wildlands. (Also water plants if in the season for a garden).
  • After supper, spend quality time with family.
  • Sleep.

Non-work days:

  • Get up
  • Dress in all natural clothing
  • Drink some coffee and some jerky or hot cereal.
  • Do school work for herbalist training.
  • Spend time out in the wildlands getting to know my natural surroundings (activities vary).
  • Spend a bit of time online connecting to the larger rewilding community, if time allows.
  • Supper and family time.

This varies some as need arise, such as illness, wildlands needs, and food needs